Archive for March, 2009

Welcome to Ontario – Monty Python

March 16, 2009

The part about the Lady of the Lake – Think Gaia, Earth Goddess and the environmental movement. Is the toady beside the King, Smitherman or is it Suzuki? I can’t make out the face.

Top 15 blog posts

March 12, 2009

These are the most read posts on this blog over the last 30 days

Ontario becomes a Fascist State

Not in my Backyard Jane Pepino

Mind Maps – A Form of Child Porn?

Loss of local control

Turbine leaseholder complains of noise

Township puts moratorium on turbines

BILL C6

Wind Concerns Ontario

Wind turbine noise affects health

Carbon Tax on Children?

Wind farms are proof positive

DAVID ROCKEFELLER THANKS MEDIA FOR ITS SILENCE

Bill 150: Is it green? Is it democratic?

The New World Order – Explained

Ontario becomes a Fascist State

March 8, 2009

Editors Opinion:

Ontario can no longer be regarded as a province of Canada.  Over the years it has been slowly guided by the will of NWO (New World Order/UN) elite to what it has become today – One more Fascist State of the NWO.

The GEA (green energy act) is a perfect example.

Under the guise of “green energy” the public has been conned into giving up their rights and are now being forced to accept corporate rule. It was CanWEA (Canadian Wind Energy Association) and the NGO’s (Non Governmental Organizations) that came up with the idea of the GEA not the government. The purpose of the GEA  is to remove the democratic rights of “the people” and give those rights to the corporations.

When the govt. gives  corporations the right to write the rules and refuses to listen to the concerns of the people – we have entered into a state of Fascism.

“Fascism should rightly be called corporatism, as it is the merger of state and corporate power” – Benito Mussolini

“…somebody has to take governments’ place, and business seems to me to be a logical entity to do it.” – David Rockefeller – Newsweek International, Feb 1 1999.

The GEA goes further – It now gives the govt. the legal right to enter your home under the guise of saving the environment. If you refuse their inspectors entry they can get a court order and if you still refuse to comply you will be fined and possibly jailed.

Ontario becomes a Fascist State the day the GEA is enacted

Read the Green Agenda and Cloak of Green on page bar.

Global Warming the Big LIE!

Network

Green Energy Police

Ontario’s war on carbon

Loss of local control

Ontario’s war on carbon

Al Gore – Madman? or Communist?

Beware! The Green Shirts Are Here

Elitism & Depopulation lurking behin

Mind Maps – A Form of Child Porn?

The New World Order – Explained

Man is the Enemy!

Green Energy Police

March 6, 2009

Editor:  If this does not wake you up to the scam that is the Green Energy Act of Ontario nothing will. The freedom you used to enjoy in your own home is about to be removed under the guise of saving the environment.

Welcome to Fascism in Ontario!

.

Green energy police: Is that a beer fridge in your basement?

Posted: March 05, 2009, 7:24 PM by NP Editor

Green Energy Act Ontario’s Green Energy Act, as proposed by the McGuinty government, would give the province new powers of search and seizure. Under a section dealing with “Mandatory conservation and energy efficiency practices,” the act aims to enforce energy- and water-use efficiency standards. To aid enforcement, a section of the act deals with the methods to be used. Here are some excerpts: Part IV: Inspections, Enforcement and Penalties Inspectors 15.

(1) The Deputy Minister may designate in writing any person as an inspector for the purposes of Parts I and III. Powers, Part III

(3) For the purposes of Part III and the regulations, an inspector designated under subsection (1), (a) at any reasonable time, may enter any place where an appliance or product to which Part III applies is manufactured, offered for sale, sold or leased; (b) may request the production for inspection of documents or things that may be relevant to the carrying out of an inspection or test on an appliance or product to which Part III applies; (c) upon giving a receipt for it, may remove from a place documents or things produced pursuant to a request under clause (b) for the purpose of making copies or extracts and shall promptly return them to the person who produced them; (d) may inspect and test any appliance or product to which

Part III applies to ensure that the appliance or product complies with the Part and the regulations; and (e) may require any person to co-operate in and assist with an inspection or test. Entry of dwelling (4) A person shall not exercise a power of entry conferred by this Part to enter a place that is being used as a dwelling without the consent of the occupier except under the authority of a warrant issued under this section. Search warrant (5) Upon application made without notice by an inspector, a justice of the peace may issue a warrant, if he or she is satisfied on information under oath that there is reasonable ground for believing that, (a) a person has contravened or is contravening Part I or III or the regulations; and (b) there is, (i) in any building, dwelling, receptacle or place anything relating to the contravention of Part I or III or the regulations, or (ii) information or evidence relating to the contravention of Part I or III or the regulations that may be obtained through the use of an investigative technique or procedure or the doing of anything described in the warrant.

Powers under warrant (6) Subject to any conditions contained in it, a warrant obtained under subsection (5) authorizes an inspector, (a) to enter or access the building, dwelling, receptacle or place specified in the warrant and examine and seize anything described in the warrant; (b) to use any data storage, processing or retrieval device or system in order to produce information or evidence described in the warrant, in any form;

Entry of dwelling (7) Despite subsection (6), an inspector shall not exercise the power under a warrant to enter a place, or part of a place, used as a dwelling, unless, (a) the justice of the peace is informed that the warrant is being sought to authorize entry into a dwelling; and (b) the justice of the peace authorizes the entry into the dwelling. Time of execution (10) An entry or access under a warrant issued under this section shall be made between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m., unless the warrant specifies otherwise… Penalty 16.

(1) Every person who contravenes any provision of Part I, Part III or this Part or the regulations is guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable to a fine of not more than $10,000 or, if the person is a body corporate, to a fine of not more than $25,000.

(2) Where a body corporate contravenes any provision of Part I, Part III or this Part or the regulations, every director or officer of the body corporate who authorizes, permits or acquiesces in the contravention is a party to and guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable to the penalty provided for in the offence whether or not the body corporate has been prosecuted or convicted.

National Post

Ontario’s war on carbon

March 5, 2009

Editor: I would like to thank the Post for this article. How much taxpayer money has been wasted financing this scam. Everyone and I mean everyone from McGuinty on down should do maximum jail time. This scam runs deeper than any scam ever perpetrated on the people of this province. Every single  person involved  must be held accountable. Politicians and individuals alike.

This province belongs to the people not a bunch of crooked politicians and their business friends.

This goes for the opposition parties as well. By their silence they are guilty as well.

It’s over McGuinty and friends. It’s over. The time for your prosecution is near.

Terence Corcoran: Ontario’s war on carbon

But this is turning into a Big Green Lie. Ontario, along with the United States and the rest of Canada, will get what Europe already has: massive carbon taxes and massive regulation and subsidies for renewables. The effect will be to drive up the price of every form of energy, whether it’s based on carbon, wind, solar, biomass or flatulating cattle.

Green agitators

Who’s pushing for all this? Not the people. The major backers of green power tax-and-grab regimes are hundreds of businesses that stand to collect billions in subsidies and tax benefits from solar, wind and other alternative energy forms.

Business groups, with major lobbying and legal backing, are in cahoots with green activists, who, in turn, are sleeping with government bureaucrats and politicians.

Let’s follow some money. There’s the Ontario Green Energy Act Alliance, the major lobbying effort behind the new green police state. It self-describes its origins: “The Ontario Sustainable Energy Association (OSEA), together with other leading trade associations, environmental groups, First Nations, developers, manufacturers, farmers and landowners, is initiating a campaign to create the Ontario Green Energy Act.”

Among the backers of the alliance is the Pembina Institute. The institute’s former climate campaigner, Robert Hornung, is now head of the Canadian Wind Energy Association, which in turn gives money to Pembina. Pembina writes glowing reports on renewables.

Pembina also receives money from the Ontario Power Authority, the Ontario Energy Board and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Another alliance backer is Environmental Defence, the radical Ottawa-based activist group headed by Rick Smith. Last year, Environmental Defence received $500,000 in funding from the government of Ontario. It would appear that one source of that money was the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation, which is largely funded by Dalton McGuinty’s Liberal government. Rick Smith recently resigned from the Greenbelt Foundation, where he was a director.

Another Green Act Alliance backer is the Ontario Clean Air Alliance. It gets money from local community groups, such as the York Region Environmental Alliance, which is largely funded by the agenda-driven Ontario Trillium Foundation, which spends Ontario lottery cash. The Clean Air Alliance also counts the Energy Action Council of Toronto as a member. Its major backers include the Ontario Energy Ministry and the Ontario lottery operation.

In summary, the Ontario government pays millions of dollars to environmental activists and corporate interests to lobby the Ontario government and agitate for the Green Energy Act, which act serves the interests of the agitators.

And just in case the political connections might be lost, the Ontario Clean Energy Act Alliance’s Web site provides a handy link to the Ontario Liberal Party — not the Ontario government, but the Liberal Party — Web site that highlights George Smitherman and Dalton McGuinty. The Web link says: “Paid for by the Toronto Centre Provincial Liberal Association.”

So a final question on Ontario’s new Green Energy Act: What’s the definition of corruption?

Financial Post

Full Srory here

Loss of local control

March 5, 2009

Loss of local control concern at green energy meeting

Posted By Don Crosby

Concerns are being raised that the proposed provincial Green Energy Act threatens the authority of local municipal councils.“Municipal powers are our checks and balances. Once they are removed for any reason you set a priority, you have lost your democratic right. This is not what the Green Energy Act should be about,” said Ron Stephens of Kincardine, who attended a public meeting in Markdale on Tuesday night about the province’s proposal.

The meeting was sponsored by the Ontario Sustainable Energy Association and Ontario Federation of Agriculture.

Tuesday’s meeting in Markdale was one of several being held by OSEA and other members of the energy alliance in communities across the province to promote the new bill and drum up support for the proposed legislation.

Stephens and others at the meeting expressed their concern that in a bid to streamline regulations around development of renewable energy the province has promised to establish standardized setbacks and shorten environmental assessment times that would favour developers and speed up the approval process while reducing local control.

“We don’t need the Green Energy Act. We can figure things our ourselves,” Stephens said.

The Ontario government introduced its proposed Green Energy Act late last month after a year of lobbying by the Green Energy Alliance — a network of agricultural, labour, industrial and environmental organizations.

The proposed act includes:

• A commitment to improve energy conservation.

• An obligation to purchase power from sustainable energy sources over other sources.

• Fair prices for renewable energy based on the cost of production and guaranteed over the long term.
An obligation for all utilities to connect renewable energy to the electricity grid.

• Financing programs for community-owned energy projects.

• An adjustment of electricity prices to reflect true costs and promote conservation.

• First Nations and Metis community participation.

The bill passed first and second reading late last month and is now before a standing committee for public input.

Grey Highlands Mayor Brian Mullin said it’s a bit too soon to be concerned.

The details of any legislation are in the regulations, which are passed by the government and not the legislature.

His municipality did a lot of work and spent a lot of money to create policies governing renewable energy in Grey Highlands.

“On the other hand there are some issues are bigger that we can’t address and have to be addressed by the province, such as connections to the grid,” said Mullin.

He’s concerned that that regulations won’t be tight enough to protect everyone and that the timetable for approval of the bill is quite short. It is expected to become law this summer.

Mullin said concerned residents can post comments on the provincial Environmental Bill of Rights website and make presentations before the standing committee, which has begun public hearings.

Tuesday’s meeting began with a video comparing the advances that Germany is making in renewable energy with what’s happening in Canada, which was portrayed as lagging far behind many European countries in wind, solar and biogas.

Tony Clark of Chatsworth said the video created an erroneous impression.

“They always compare Canada to Germany and say we should be like Germany. That’s absolutely nonsense, they should be like us. Germany already gets 60 per cent of its power from fossil fuels (coal and gas) and they are implementing 26,000 megawatts more of coal generated electricity. That’s the equivalent of the total amount of power we have in Ontario. Canada only gets about 27 per cent of our power from coal . . . they are light years behind us,” Clark said.

“I’m really upset that the new Green Energy Act will take away the rights of municipalities and the civil rights of residents of Ontario . . . it sets a precedent and once the government does it a precedent will be set and they will do it again and again,” Clark said.

Read more at Sun Times

heads-sand-web1.jpg

Township puts moratorium on turbines

March 4, 2009

Enbridge wind farm Kincardine Ontario

Enbridge wind farm Kincardine Ontario

Township puts Two-year moratorium on turbines; issue will go to referendum

The Township of Madawaska Valley Council has slapped a moratorium on the approval of any wind turbine projects until next year’s municipal elections, at which time voters will have a chance to vote on the wind farm issue in a referendum question attached to their ballots.

The move came after an at-times heated debate on the issue at Monday night’s regular council meeting.

It is not clear just how much direct impact council’s measure will have – Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty has warned that he will not let local opposition stand in the way of so-called Green Energy projects, and has said that the province will take responsibility for the approval of such proposals – most notably industrial wind turbine farms – away from municipalities. Indeed, some council members acknowledged that they expect the provincial government will overrule them. Nonetheless, council’s move will likely diffuse much of the ongoing public pressure on council over the wind turbine controversy.

At the moment, the sole project proposed for the Township of Madawaska Valley is for the construction of six of the mammoth turbines on the hills north of the Village of Wilno. But

several other projects, many of them much larger, are planned for the Township of South Algonquin to the west, and in communities to the east and southeast of Madawaska Valley as well.

Up until Monday night, Madawaska Valley Council’s stand had been that, while it had listened to many submissions from opponents of the industrial wind project, it had not yet heard from the wind power company. Mayor John Hildebrandt had stated several times that council wanted to hear the other side of the story before taking a position. This was criticized by some opponents, who wanted council to come out solidly against turbines.

The resolution to put the matter on hold pending a referendum in 2010 was tabled by Councillor Sylvie Yantha, who in doing so was resurrecting a similar motion that he had initially proposed in November. Last night’s version was immediately seconded by Councillor Shelley Maika and the other councillors supported it.

“I think we should give the people a choice as to what they want,” Yantha said in making his motion. “I think that … the voters are waiting for answers. Let’s let the voters decide.”

Monday night’s meeting began with two delegations on the wind issue, which has been in the public eye since a firm named SkyPower first proposed to build six turbines near Wilno early in 2008.

Carl Bromwich of Wilno said he was appearing to ask that a public meeting be convened on the issue “to smooth over some of the rough edges” surrounding the dispute. He praised Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke MPP John Yakabuski for “leading our fight in the Legislature” against the Liberal government’s Green Energy Act bill, saying he was “doing a hell of a good job.” But it is time that MV council spoke out on the matter, too, Bromwich said.

He urged council to “use the powers you have now to make a statement” against the Green Energy Act and wind turbines.

“Your power is our power and if we lose it, we’re going to be answering to (Energy and Infrastructure Minister) George Smitherman and Dalton McGuinty for the rest of our lives.”

Later, Lou Eyamie of SOS, or Save Our Skyline, the lead organization fighting against the Wilno wind farm proposal, also urged council to take a stand on the wind farm proposal.

“I firmly believe that if you people don’t make your position known … you’re going to be too late,” Eyamie said.

Municipal politicians in the townships of South Algonquin, where several turbines are planned for near the eastern border of Algonquin Provincial Park, and in Killaloe, Hagarty and Richards, where no wind projects are currently proposed, have passed moratoriums on any approvals of wind turbines. Those measures, combined with several others approved by municipalities across the province, were followed by the provincial government’s plan to take over the power to set guidelines and approve projects under its Green Energy Act, which is now before the Legislature.

Denise Brotton of Wilno also addressed council. She said she was glad to see that council has taken the initiative “to do something” about the wind farm controversy, but was skeptical of the McGuinty government’s promises that municipalities will receive money from the wind turbines built in their communities.

“I have no faith that they will contribute anything to us,” she said.

She also cited a news release by MPP John Yakabuski that questions Liberal promises that electricity prices will not rise sharply under the Green Energy Act. Smitherman had pegged the increase at one per cent.

In the Feb. 24 release, Yakabuski noted that Smitherman himself put the cost of the bill at $5 billion. Yakabuski suggested that, with 4.2 million electricity consumers in Ontario footing that bill, this would mean each consumer would face an average increase of $1,200 – a 30 per cent increase over three years.

By Douglas Gloin

Barry’s Bay This Week 4 March 2009

think

Turbine leaseholder complains of noise

March 4, 2009

Turbine leaseholder complains of noise in Cohocton, New York

Description:

Global Warming Crisis?

March 2, 2009

Hundreds protest Global Warming

Pic was found at Asia Academy

No future for wind in Ontario

March 2, 2009
Editor:
Received this story from a reader this morning. I had to rub my eyes several times before I could believe what I was reading and in the Toronto Star no less.
Someone that understands electrical generation writing the truth about wind generation. Wow!
I and thousands of others have been saying the same thing for years. All the articles until the last few days seem to be written by one “green group” or another pushing wind and telling us about their vision.
All I can say is try heating your home or running your business on a vision.
Put the scrubbers on the coal plants and build a nuke- cost 10 billion and it will provide clean reliable energy for the Province. (C02 is not a pollutant)
The vision 60-80 billion ( money that is not going to health care, education, agriculture or many other places the money would be better used)  and the air won’t be any cleaner.
The truth is getting out but will this be enough to stop the madness presently found at Queens’ Park. Don’t forget both the Conservatives and the NDP have bought into and have been promoting this same “MAD” vision.
I have included the emails for all MPP’s in this Province at the end of the article. Take a minute and send them your thoughts.
Remember between 50 and 70 billion will wasted on the “Mad Vision” That doesn’t count the millions or billions wasted to date in the massive promotion of this “Mad Vision”
Wind is and always was about the creation of carbon credits. Not cleaner air.
The “Green sales pitch” has run out of Air, Wind and Gas
.
No future for wind in Ontario

PATRICK CORRIGAN/TORONTO STAR

Need for support from gas-powered plants means it’s also not even very green
Mar 02, 2009 04:30 AM



The Ontario government says its new Green Energy Act, if passed, will help Ontario become “North America’s leader in renewable energy.”

But since most of this new renewable energy will be from wind, it may not be the smartest move for Ontario because its large hydro and nuclear capacity is not compatible with wind generation. Wind requires natural gas-fired generation for support and natural gas will be a most precarious fuel for Ontario.

The future of industrial wind power in Ontario is tied to natural gas-fired electricity generation and that, as will be seen, is unsustainable. The Ontario power grid needs flexible support to keep supply and demand in balance, and providing this support will be made more difficult when we add the vagaries of wind.

Although nuclear units can handle the daily and weekend changes in electricity demand, they have limited capability for the kind of frequent power-up and power-down requirements that would be needed for this support. Furthermore, hydroelectric plants may not always be available due to fluctuations in water supply and water management agreements.

Even without restrictions on nuclear and hydro, it makes little economic sense to run reliable suppliers of steady power, with high fixed costs and low operating costs, at reduced output to support the expensive, intermittent and varying output from wind farms.

So, with coal being phased out by 2014, natural gas-fired generation will have to be used to support wind. Due to the simultaneous demands of home heating and electricity generation in the winter, that may lead to gas shortages. So some of these plants may be dual fuelled with gas and oil, which is not a pleasant thought.

The Ontario government is putting too much faith in natural gas for electricity generation, as the United Kingdom did with its “dash for gas” from the North Sea in the 1990s when gas was cheap. Now the U.K. is in terrible shape with its gas running out and the threat of power shortages in the next decade.

There is no long-term future for gas-fired generation in Ontario because of greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, rising costs, the demands on gas for other uses (in the tar sands, the chemical industry, home heating, exports to the United States), declining reserves, the questionable security of foreign supplies or, in short, the waste of a premium non-renewable resource just to generate electricity.

Since Ontario’s wind generators require natural-gas-fired generation for support, this creates an uncertain future for wind turbines and their transmission infrastructure that one day will not be compatible with a nuclear/hydro powered grid. Nor is there an environmental benefit to adding wind to a clean nuclear/hydro grid.

There is an alternative to building more natural gas-fired power plants in the Greater Toronto Area and other locations to replace the coal-fired stations. That is to increase the arbitrary limit on nuclear from the 14,000 megawatts imposed by the government. Bruce Power showed its willingness to build new nuclear power plants last October when it asked the nuclear safety regulator for a licence to prepare a site at Nanticoke, in addition to new units at the Bruce site.

The government’s power plan envisages nuclear supplying 40 per cent of electricity demand by 2027. This should be raised to more than 70 per cent, with hydro supplying most of the remainder. If there is no market for nuclear-generated electricity during off-peak and overnight hours (for power exports, recharging electric cars, producing hydrogen and/or compressed air for generating clean peaking power and other uses), the plants can reduce their output to meet the demand. This means that even if practical wind energy storage were available, wind still would not be needed on a future all nuclear/hydro grid.

The demand on the grid from recharging electric cars should not be underestimated. The president and CEO of French nuclear giant Areva said that it would take an additional 6,400 megawatts of electricity if just 10 per cent of France’s cars were electrically powered. That translates into about 1,700 megawatts (two Darlington-size units) for Ontario.

In France, the nuclear energy share of electricity production is about 78 per cent from its 58 reactors, with the balance divided nearly equally between hydro and fossil, and with the nuclear units able to meet daily changes in electricity demand. Sweden has a grid the same size as Ontario’s but with almost all nuclear/hydro generation.

Wind has no long-term future in Ontario and will be more of a hindrance than a help to the grid’s reliability. The Ontario Energy Board should take a good hard look at the government’s Integrated Power System Plan, eliminate wind and promote cleaned-up coal-fired stations operating past 2014 until sufficient nuclear is online to avoid the building of anymore unsustainable gas-fired plants.

The technical, economic and environmental issues associated with wind power have not been fully explored. Let’s hope the Ontario Energy Board will give them due consideration when it reconvenes so that money can be put where it will do Ontario the most long-term good.

Donald Jones is a professional engineer, now retired after 35 years of CANDU system design.

Comments on this story are moderated

From the Toronto Star
Liberals MPP’s
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Opposition MPP’s
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bob.runciman@pc.ola.org,
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laurie.scott@pc.ola.org,
peter.shurman@pc.ola.org,
norm.sterling@pc.ola.org,
tabunsp-qp@ndp.on.ca,
jim.wilson@pc.ola.org,
elizabeth.witmer@pc.ola.org,
john.yakabuski@pc.ola.org