Archive for the ‘Canadian Hydro Developers Inc.’ Category

Wind turbines 'are ruining our quality of life'

July 25, 2008

Editor:

The problems with wind turbines being placed near homes has been known for years.

The Govt of Ontario is well aware of the problems, because they have volumes of information on the subject, but have chosen to ignore it. They
are guilty of putting the health of residents of Ontario at risk.

A fact that can no longer be disputed.

Dr. Ian Gemmill, Kingston’s medical officer of health, said – “that though there are concerns about low-level noise, appearance and stress caused by the turbines, research has suggested that those effects don’t cause long-term health impacts after people are no longer living near wind farms”.(People forced from their homes or stay and suffer ill health)

Board member Vicki Schmolka told the board that she wasn’t sure that
she agreed with Gemmill’s conclusion. She indicated that she felt there
are health concerns associated with the turbines that the board should
investigate further.

The abuse of the residents of Ontario Must stop NOW!

A moratorium on any further construction of wind turbines must be put in place, until it can be proven by Heath Canada that they are safe for the public to live near.
For safety reasons, there are no smoking laws, seat belt laws, life jacket laws etc.etc.etc.
Until the studies have been done. No more Turbines.

By Martin Beckford

The majority of people living near wind turbines believe that the noise they make is ruining their health and quality of life, a report has revealed.

Neighbours also claim that the constant hum and the loud “whooshing” sound made by the blades in high winds is destroying the value of their homes.

A survey of people whose homes are situated within 1.2 miles of turbines has shown that three-quarters of them feel that the noise has damaged their quality of life while four out of five say it has affected their health.

Those who said they were made ill by the sound of the wind farms, which are designed to benefit the environment, described conditions ranging from migraines and palpitations to depression.

Three quarters said their sleep was disturbed by the noise and some claimed that they had been forced to stay in bed and breakfasts to get a proper night’s rest or to sell their homes at reduced prices to get away from the area.

One of the respondents to the survey, carried out by a family doctor, claimed that the noise was “like Chinese water torture”, while others said they could “see no future” and “dare not sleep at home”.

Dr Amanda Harry, a Plymouth GP who compiled the report after studying

the effects of wind turbine noise for several years, wrote: “What this shows is that there are a number of people suffering from the consequences of noise from the wind turbines.

“I’m sure that the cases mentioned here are the tip of the iceberg and further independent investigation is warranted.

There is much concern within communities that if one is seen to complain about the noise and if they decide to move away, their properties will be difficult to sell and possibly devalued as a result. They feel they are in a ‘Catch-22’ situation.”

Some wind farms are situated just a few hundred yards from homes but Dr Harry believes that until independent research is carried out, no turbines should be built closer than 1.5 miles from the nearest dwelling.

Dr Harry wrote: “There are many people living near wind turbines who are suffering from problems with their health. The noise produced from the wind turbines is an extremely complex one and I feel that it is the complexity of the noise and vibration which causes the disturbance.

“From my discussions with people suffering from ill-health who live near wind farms, it seems that the symptoms suffered can occur up to a mile from the wind farm.”

From the Telegraph

Wind turbine noise affects health

February 24, 2008

Editor
This is a damning report of the govt., the wind industry and the Provincial and Federal health departments.


research has suggested that those effects don’t cause long-term health impacts after people are no longer living near wind farms”.

Health Canada has never done a study of the health affects of wind turbines on the health of the people. I’ve asked, as have many others, both the Provincial and Federal Health Ministries why there hasn’t been a health study conducted. Now we know.

They already know industrial wind turbines are being placed too close to people and they know they have negative affects. Once you have been run off your property, the ill affects you experienced living next to a 400 ft. high wind turbine will disappear. Using their logic, there is no need for a health study.

d_entremont-point-pubnico.jpg
Daniel d’entremont and his family were forced from their home. The good news is their health is slowly returning to normal. They can’t live in their home any longer, but who cares about a home when you have your health.

Your government doesn’t give a damn, it’s that simple.

.

Wind farm raises health concerns; No long-term effect, says Kingston doctor

Posted By Jennifer Pritchett

Kingston’s public health department will lobby government for more research into the health effects of wind turbines.

Dr. Ian Gemmill, Kingston’s medical officer of health, says there hasn’t been enough monitoring done to determine whether they’re harmful.

Gemmill made the declaration at a board of health meeting this week in response to residents who live near the proposed site of a wind farm to be built on Wolfe Island.

The citizens had asked public health to assess the health risks associated with the turbines, but based on the information that is available, Gemmill said, there is nothing to indicate that wind turbines have any long-term effect on people’s health.

“We haven’t got a lot of evidence to go on right now,” said Gemmill. Gemmill said that though there are concerns about low-level noise, appearance and stress caused by the turbines, research has suggested that those effects don’t cause long-term health impacts after people are no longer living near wind farms.

As well, much of the research that is available, he said, doesn’t appear to come from reputable sources.

“Our conclusion is that while there may be some short-term concerns, this will not have a long-term health effect,” said Gemmill.

Board member Vicki Schmolka told the board that she wasn’t sure that she agreed with Gemmill’s conclusion. She indicated that she felt there are health concerns associated with the turbines that the board should investigate further.

“Seems to me what we’re really saying is that this person needs to move away and they’ll be OK,” she said.

Schmolka, who is also a city councillor, asked Gemmill if he was comfortable saying that there were definitively no long-term health effects from wind turbines.

“I’m saying it’s reversible,” he responded. “I know that people are bothered by this, but the question here is when do we become involved.”

thewhigJennifer Pritchett

Wind turbine noise affects health

According to the results of a new peer-reviewed study made available to us by the U.S. government’s National Institutes of Health, the connection between noise and coronary heart disease — particularly at night — is serious.

Wind energy ordinances must include a top limit for how much turbine noise can safely be added to our environment.

More than 15 million Americans currently have some form of coronary heart disease (CHD), which involves a narrowing of the small blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart. Risk factors for CHD include diabetes, high blood pressure, altered blood lipids, obesity, smoking, menopause, and inactivity.

To this list we can now add noise, thanks to a recent study and assessment of the evidence by the WHO Noise Environmental Burden on Disease working group.

“The new data indicate that noise pollution is causing more deaths from heart disease than was previously thought,” says working group member Deepak Prasher, a professor of audiology.

The working group compared households with abnormally high noise exposure with those with quieter homes. They also reviewed epidemiologic data on heart disease and hypertension, and then integrated these data.

“Many people become habituated to noise over time,” says Prasher. “The biological effects are imperceptible, so that even as you become accustomed to the noise, adverse physiological changes are nevertheless taking place, with potentially serious consequences to human health.”

Chronic high levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline can lead to hypertension, stroke, heart failure, and immune problems. According to research, arousal associated with nighttime noise exposure increased blood and saliva concentrations of these hormones even during sleep.

“Taken together, recent epidemiologic data show us that noise is a major stressor that can influence health through the endocrine, immune, and cardiovascular systems,” says Prasher.

The broader implications of chronic noise exposure also need to be considered.

“Noise pollution contributes not only to cardiovascular disease, but also to hearing loss, sleep disruption, social handicaps, diminished productivity, impaired teaching and learning, absenteeism, increased drug use, and accidents,” says physician Louis Hagler, who coauthored a review on noise pollution in the March 2007 Southern Medical Journal.

Hagler added, “The public health repercussions of increasing noise pollution for future generations could be immense.”

M. Nathaniel Mead

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Wind Watch News

OMB dashes hopes for quick start on turbines

November 22, 2007

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Any hope Canadian Hydro Developers Inc. might have had for an early start to the Melancthon II wind farm project appears to have been effectively dashed by a decision of the Ontario Municipal Board.

OMB member Norman Jackson has generally decided conditionally in favour of the Melancthon II wind turbines planned for Amaranth Township, but has withheld his order pending a resolution of noise complaints at the transformer substation, among other things, and wants a continuation of the hearing to resolve the specific issues.

Beyond noise from the transformers, Mr. Jackson wants a continuation of the hearing at some point prior to issuing his order. The outstanding issues to be dealt with at that time include construction drawings, de-icing measures, a decommissioning agreement and an amenities agreement.

Neither the guardedly favourable decision nor the withholding was entirely unexpected. During the hearing, Mr. Jackson had cited the Provincial Policy Statement on wind energy as something of a higher authority than his. At the conclusion of the hearing on Oct. 18, there was an understanding that the order would be withheld. The township had agreed in principle to the turbines at the outset of the hearing.

Also during the hearing, Mr. Jackson had indicated his dissatisfaction with the Ministry of Environment’s issuance of a Certificate of Approval for the first of two transformers at the substation in the face of noise complaints from several neighbours.

The transformer noise appears in Mr. Jackson’s conclusions as the gravest of concerns. He indicates that he is doubtful that the noise can be overcome:

“The Board is not satisfied with the increased level of noise site planning through berms nd noise walls and other mitigation measures that the result in the combined transformer site will be an improvement rather than a continuation or worsening of the present hum so graphically described by witnesses and parties in this hearing,” he says.

“This is based upon past mitigative actions and results from the first generator (transformer) that warrant continued monitoring and independence in reporting.”

He goes on to indicate that he wants the noise issue, with respect to the first one, to be completely resolved before he approves a second one.

As well, consistent with his earlier expression of dissatisfaction with Ministry of Environment regulations on noise, he said: “The Board appreciates the work of officials but when the analysis is incomplete (continued monitoring) and the approval process seems to change in midstream, it causes the Board to carefully review its jurisdiction in this case….”

The resolution of the transformer noise issue might be sufficiently complicated that it would require removing the first transformer and reinstalling it some distance below grade – a suggestion that Mr. Jackson notes as having been made late in the hearing.

Outside the noise issues, Mr. Jackson found that CHD had dealt satisfactorily with several other matters, including aerodromes. On aerodromes, he was satisfied with a 2.5- kilometre setback from each end of unregistered ones, plus 600 metres on both sides of the airstrip. Those separations are increased for a few specific ones, such as four kilometres from the ends of runways at Burbank, Kot, Briggs and Pomeroy fields.

Some of those, he found, are in excess of Transport Canada recommendations. He found the planning to be “reasonable and to represent good planning.”

The required Amenities Agreement would be an amount of money paid directly to the township, such that it needn’t be shared with the county or school boards. The decision doesn’t say it, but CHD and the township appear to have agreed to an annual payment of $4,000 per turbine (in addition to the industrial tax on the installations).

Although the order has been withheld, the township during the hearings appeared fully in agreement with site-specific OP amendments for 22 turbines.

Orangeville Citizen

22 November 2007