Archive for the ‘vote McGuinty’ Category

Dalton McGuinty Wants to Paint it Red

September 8, 2007

Paint it Red

Please check out the Liberal web site and see if you can find any reference to wind energy. I can’t.

Maybe they don’t mention it so no one will ask them any questions.

Even Dwight Duncan the Energy Minster who is going to devastate his own riding with wind farms doesn’t mention them.

I see they are going to name a school after David Suzuki. David is a Sheep Herder. If you are a SHEEP follow David and enroll your child in SHEEP SCHOOL. Sheep will save the world lol

Be sure not to disagree with David, he gets upset.
Even David doesn’t mention wind farms much anymore. He likes light bulbs better. Not many hard questions about light bulbs.

To the Liberal Party and David Suzuki

 

flick off
OFF

Paint it Red

visit the Liberal web site

wulfshagen04.jpg

This post is my lame attempt at humor.

I really do believe everything the Liberal Party-David Suzuki and Al Gore want me to believe and I think we should all be painted RED.

Energy plan calls for wind, nuclear

August 30, 2007

From the Editor:

Dalton and his band of fools are so ludicrous that after they get the boot on Oct. the 10th they might want to shop their time in power to the CBC as a comedy. It might be funny as a sitcom but it’s far from funny as reality.

Ever since deregulation our electrical grid has been a disaster.

Deregulation did not work to the benefit of the citizens of Ont. and needs to be rolled back.

So who you gonna vote for.

Dalton is a disaster.

John Tory wants to fill up the great lakes with windmills . Expensive and unworkable.

Howard Hampton wants to run the grid with wind and solar. Expensive and unworkable.

Why is Dofasco, Canada’s biggest and most profitable steelmaker going to coal? Because gas is way too expensive. What do these parties plan to use to back up the wind and solar? Gas. Watch your hydro bill soar like an eagle.

The people who should be looking after our electrical needs know and will tell you that the best option at this time is to put the scrubbers on the coal plants and build another nuke.

If you allow reality to enter your mind you will come to the same conclusion.

options-for-coal-fired-power-plants-in-Ontario

 

 

Coal-fired plants to be phased out by the end of 2014, but some will be kept operational for “insurance purposes” in case of an unexpected shortfall in power supply or unusually high demand. Read the entire new plan at the National Post

From the Editor:

Which is it Dalton or do you know. You told the people of Ont. that you would close the coal plants in 2007 then you said for sure in 2014. Now you say you will phase them out by the end of 2014 but at the same time you will keep them operational. Why? Just in case you don’t have a clue what you are talking about. Goodbye Dalton. Don’t let the door hit you in the ass on your way out the door.

Find your MPP here 

 

Read the story from the Sarnia Observer below

Liberals Reveal Easy Hypocrisy

The desperation shown by Dalton McGuinty’s Liberal government heading into the Oct. 10th provincial election reached new heights last week when it announced $6 million to help a Hamilton steel company replace natural gas with coal in its operations.

The Liberals, of course, are the same party that issued a legally binding regulation just days earlier to close Ontario’s four remaining coal-fired power plants by 2014, a move that spells the end of the Lambton Generating Station and 400 well-paid local jobs.

To cut operating costs, Dofasco is building a $60-million pulverized coal injection system to run two blast furnaces. By switching to coal from natural gas the Hamilton-based company expects to save about $28 million a year.

Dofasco is Canada’s biggest and most profitable steelmaker. Yet McGuinty still cuts the company a cheque for $6 million of taxpayer’s money, part of a pre-election spending blitz that has reached dizzying proportions.

Read the full story THE SARNIA OBSERVER (more…)

Environmentalists want clotheslines ban lifted

July 29, 2007

From the Editor

As soon as Dalton figures out how his corporate buddies can make money by allowing people to hang out the laundry he will lift the ban. Until then keep using those dryers. If stories like this weren’t so outrageous they would make me laugh. Oct 1oth send McGuinty his pink slip. I was a Liberal until Uncle Dalton came along. We’ve had some lame premiers but this guy takes the cake.


Canadian press

It’s a simple, functional part of the solution to Canada’s energy addiction: allowing people to hang their sheets, T-shirts and undies outside to dry.

So why, then, is the simple, time-tested concept of the clothesline conjuring such cross-country controversy?

Sure, the sight of a hefty neighbour’s boxers fluttering in the breeze might turn some stomachs – indeed, that’s the main reason some communities draw the line at air-dried laundry.

In Ontario, however, a growing number of environmentalists and municipal politicians are calling on the government to override local clothesline bans – something it could do with the stroke of a pen.

Many are now wondering why the province appears to be dragging its heels on measures that would allow people to harness free solar and wind energy by hanging their clothes out to dry.

This is not a draconian measure,” Stewart said. “It’s not like laundry is a threat to the morals of our youth. All it’s saying is people are allowed to use a clothesline.” The Liberals passed an energy conservation leadership law shortly after their election in 2003 that included a clause that allows the province to abolish local bans on clotheslines imposed by developers through sale agreements and residential associations.

But the Liberals have never taken advantage of the clause, meaning it remains against the law in some aesthetically-minded communities to let unmentionables flap immodestly in the breeze.

It doesn’t make sense at a time when everyone is being urged to change their habits to cut greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy during a hot summer, Stewart said.

“It really is very silly,” he said. “This isn’t a huge thing but it’s incredibly easy to do. It’s not like they need a mandate from the electorate to do this. They could do it tomorrow.”

Environment Minister Laurel Broten would only say Wednesday that lifting a ban on clotheslines doesn’t fall under her jurisdiction.

Phyllis Morris is at the forefront of the “right to dry” movement in Ontario. The mayor of Aurora, a suburban city just north of Toronto, has been on talk shows across the country lobbying for the right to “free the sheets.” Ironically, Morris recently had a Liberal government pamphlet delivered to her door urging her to do a number of things to help the environment – including air-drying clothes.

“I wonder what they’re waiting for,” Morris said about lifting the ban.

“We see it as a freedom of choice issue. I’m not saying people should hang their laundry outside – I’m saying shouldn’t they be able to if they want to?”

“Most people who would choose to do the environmentally sound thing would also be probably concerned for their neighbours,” she said.

“If their neighbours are having a barbecue, get your laundry in before 5 o’clock when they sit down to eat supper. That’s just being a good neighbour.”

“There is much greater public awareness that wasting energy is bad for our future. Clotheslines will soon have social cache as people who do the right thing . . . and the law will hurry along to catch up.” New Democrat Paul Ferreira said by lagging behind public consciousness, the Liberals are leaving green-minded residents “out to dry.”

“When we talk about harnessing wind power and solar power to meet our daily needs, here’s a classic example of how to do it.”

Tell your Liberal MPP what you think.Full Story

60 Hours of Wind Power in Ontario

July 25, 2007

I tracked the wind farm production from 1am on the 23rd of July 2007 until noon July 25th 2007.

At 9am today the four wind farms in Ont. with a total capacity of  396 MWs were producing zero MWs of electricity.

Over the 60 hrs. they produced a total of 1140 MWs. or 19 MWs per hr. which is about 4.8% of the plated capacity.

Many of those hours no electricity was produced and many more were in the 1 to 8 MW range.

The best production was on July 23 between the hrs. of 1am and 6am., the very time when power consumption is at its lowest.

Even though we may not require the power between 1am and 6am we must still buy it at a premium price.

Wind power started as an experiment and has since turned into, thanks to Enron, an investment scheme that has cost taxpayers billions and ruined the lives of the people living near the wind farms.

Cuba-trained US medics graduate

July 24, 2007

This is off topic but very important. The municipality of Kincardine with the help of Bruce County and spearheaded by the McGuinty govt decided that filling rural Ont. with wind farms is a good idea. IT IS NOT.

In the meantime 45% of our residents have no family doctor. They continue to starve the healthcare system while handing out billions to the energy companies. Cuba has its problems yes, but if such a poor country can make sure everyone has a family doctor then one must ask. What is wrong with Ontario and Canada in general.

Canada must be for Canadians first and and must not be handed over to the corporations. It will be your children and grandchildren that suffer because of your apathy.

Please comment

 

Cuba-trained US medics graduate

 

By Michael Voss
BBC News, Havana


Cuban doctor (file image)

Students were offered tuition, textbooks and accommodation

Eight US students are to graduate from a medical school in Cuba where they have spent the past six years training to become doctors.

Their studies were fully funded by Cuba’s communist government.

Under the deal, students must return to their communities in the US to offer low-cost healthcare.

The students came to Cuba as part of a deal agreed between President Fidel Castro and members of Washington’s Congressional Black Caucus.

The stories of the six medical students are something of a propaganda coup with Cuba, a poor communist Caribbean island, providing free training to medical students from its arch-enemy, the US.

Foreign policy tool

Under the plan, Cuba offers students from deprived backgrounds full scholarships – including tuition, textbooks, food and accommodation.

The single condition is that they must return to their respective communities and provide cheap healthcare to those who cannot afford full-price healthcare.

Senior members of the Cuban government are expected to attend Tuesday evening’s graduation ceremony in the capital.

According to the Cuban authorities, more than 80 young US students are currently receiving training at the Latin American Medical School in Havana, whose qualifications are recognised by the World Health Organization.

In recent years, Cuba’s free healthcare system has become a key foreign policy tool for winning hearts and minds in the developing world, particularly across South and Central America and parts of Africa.

The government has sent tens of thousands of Cuban doctors abroad to help some of the world’s poorest communities.

It also trains large numbers of foreign doctors on the island.

According to the official newspaper, Granma, there are currently more than 5,000 medical students from 25 countries studying in Cuba.

Green Party of Canada Opposes Placing Industrial Wind Farms too Close to Homes

July 9, 2007

The following article is the first of a new series dedicated to local issues. We’ll try to present topics of interest to everyone and we invite readers to share their experience and knowledge on local challenges. This article was written by Bernard Viau, editor of Green Canada Vert and secretary of the electoral district association (EDA) in the Quebec riding of Montmagny L’Islet Kamouraska Rivière-du-Loup, located in the lower Saint-Lawrence river area.

Wind farm projects are being announced every month in Quebec and are growing like mushrooms, but the air is turbulent in the wind industry. The promoters tell us that wind farms will reduce greenhouse gas emissions (but reducing our consumption of meat will do more to reduce the GHG emissions).

Don’t be fooled, the money they are investing in wind energy has nothing to do with the environment. Promoters build wind farms because there is a lot of money to make. Firstly, it’s a tax shelter and a very efficient one. They also receive production bonuses from the government and special credits for reducing air pollution.

Wind farms may be built on private land but they affect the landscape, which is common property, so to speak. Opposition to wind farms has focussed mainly on this spoiling of the landscape. Most of the time, we judge things according to their potential return on investment and so, it is only normal that promoters and shareholders are at loss when one speaks of the “value” of a landscape. In Europe, citizens are complaining that miles of landscape have been destroyed by wind farms; many are even complaining about health hazards associated with them. In Europe, land values have fallen around wind farms, and tourism also. Let’s face it, a wind farm is like a forest of huge towers with intermittent headlights on top of them for airplanes; nobody can miss them!

Also construction needs a lot of cement; a sea of cement would give a better picture. Thousands of trucks, very heavy, very broad and very long, damage the roads, on top of polluting with diesel fumes, noise, vibrations, dust and traffic. House foundations will be affected, and the following spring roads will break up.

In 30 years, if the promoters have not declared bankruptcy to avoid paying for dismantling of wind towers, the foundations will be left to the grandchildren of the original owners. It would be better to force promoters to put money in trust to cover end-of-life dismantling; a form of asset fund for future generations.

If promoters and shareholders had their way, public enquiries would not be necessary. Industrial wind farms are not nice and green like the promoters want us to believe.

Complete Story

Dalton McGuinty and his Wind Farm Dream

May 13, 2007

Dalton McGuinty is a DISASTER

By not putting the scrubbers on the coal plants he has put the people of Ont. at risk. He said he would shut down the coal plants in 2007. I have yet to find a report saying that was possible. Options for coal plants

He said he got bad advice.

Now he wants to cover Ontario with wind farms.

More bad advice Dalton?

Leamington has joined the Town of Essex in approving a one-year ban on new wind and solar power projects until a county planning study is done to help put some controls in place.

Dalton forgot to put controls in place.

Probably got bad advice Again

When are you going to tell the people about the thousands of megawatts of gas plants in the works to back up your wind dream.

When are you going to tell the people about the massive increases they can expect in their electric bills.

You are either a FOOL or a LIAR. Either way you are not fit to be premier of this province.

I have sent my blog to every Liberal MPP in Ontario asking that they look it over and to get back to me if they find anything they question or disagree with. To date I have had no replies. Therefore it can be concluded that the information on my blog is factual and is accepted as factual by the Liberal Party of Ont.

Tell your Liberal MPP what you think.

If you have any questions please contact me.

Please read the excerpts from

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO

Monday 10 April 2006

Mr. Garfield Dunlop (Simcoe North)

Before I wrap up here, I wanted to just spend a few moments on the blackout in 2003 and where we’re going, as a province, as a result of that. I’ll tell you, we have some very interesting data that’s coming towards us on our hydro supply and where we’re going with hydro in the province of Ontario.

It seems so amazing that we had the blackout just prior to the election. One of the election promises was that the new government, the Liberal Party, would close all coal-fired generation by the year 2007, which is now nine months away — the beginning of 2007.

I recall Dalton McGuinty on Steve Paikin’s show one night. Mr. Paikin was interviewing Mr. McGuinty, and he said, “Mr. McGuinty, would you close the coal-fired generation early in 2007 or later in the year?” He looked like a deer in the headlights when he answered the question. He said, “I’d close the coal-fired generation late in 2007.” That means sometime in November or December, 2007. That’s 6,416 megawatts that we’ll have to close down. As of today in the province of Ontario, the only coal-fired generation that has been closed down is Lakeview, and that’s the one that we had planned on closing down four years ago; Elizabeth Witmer made the announcement and was at the ceremony that actually closed it. The Progressive Conservative Party’s plan for coal-fired generation was that we would close the facilities down by 2015. That is still, today, the most realistic figure we can come up with, because we have to find a way to find 6,416 megawatts in the province of Ontario.

I was really interested today: It’s amazing that the minister’s comments on wind power came up the same day we’re debating Bill 56, we’re talking about blackouts and all that sort of thing. One of the things that really was amazing is that the government is counting on the total capacity of the wind power generation as fact. This all ties in to our need for power, so we don’t have another blackout, another natural disaster. To date: Melancthon Grey wind project, which is 67.5; the Kingsbridge wind project, 39.6 megawatts; Erie Shore’s wind farm, 99 megawatts; the Prince wind farm, 99 megawatts; and the Blue Highlands wind farm, 49.5. That’s a total of 354.6 megawatts. The minister keeps saying that’s how many megawatts she has coming on-stream.

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The reality is that in this book put out by the Independent Electricity System Operator — which I think is a government body, part of the old Ontario Hydro — it says, under an asterisk at the bottom, “For capacity planning purposes, wind generation has a dependable capacity contribution of 10% of the listed figures.” So of the 354.6 megawatts that Minister Cansfield talked about today, according to our own Independent Electricity System Operator, we really only have 35 megawatts, if you consider 10%.

The reason is that we can never shut down the other systems. We can’t shut down a nuclear reactor and use all 354 megawatts. We can’t shut down a power dam. We can’t shut down a natural-gas-fired system, because it takes too long to fire them up. Even if we bring all these wind turbines on stream, we still have to leave all the other ones in place. So not only do we have to replace 6,460 megawatts of coal-fired — we should even maintain that, or replace it with something other than wind, because the wind turbines certainly don’t have the ability to work all the time. If you have a hot summer day — 30 or 35 degrees Celsius outside — and there’s no wind, there’s no wind power. There’s no turbine going to operate that will feed our air conditioning systems across the province of Ontario.

The same thing applies to the ones that she has planned. The Wolfe Island wind project, the Leader wind project A, the Leader wind project B, Prince II wind power, Kingsbridge II, Ripley wind power project, the Kruger energy port and the Melancthon II wind project total 955 megawatts. The reality is that, under the Independent Electricity System Operator, they will only have a total capacity, probably, of around 130.9 megawatts, if you take into account the fact that this booklet says they’re only at 10% of capacity.

My concern is that we’re creating this illusion out there that we’re doing all these wonderful things in power. I’m very, very concerned that if they do close those coal-fired generators down in 2007, like they promised they would to the citizens of the province of Ontario, we won’t have nearly enough power to operate in the province and we will be in a serious blackout right here in Ontario.

Up our way, we’ve got a couple of projects, one by a company named Ventus Energy. They’re one of the companies that want to put wind power into Simcoe county; apparently there are a couple of proposals there. I understand now that a guy by the name of David Peterson is one of the members of the board of directors. I hope that’s not the David Peterson that was the Premier here. In my opinion, his ties to the Liberal Party would make this very, very uncomfortable if we go towards awarding contracts to this company. I believe that the contracts will be awarded for a 20-year period at 8.5 cents or nine cents a kilowatt-hour. My understanding, talking to people who have a lot more knowledge about wind turbines than I do myself, is that they stand to make a fortune out of this over the next 20 years, because the first 10 years will pay off the cost of the turbines.

If there’s anything we can do around electricity, because it has such an impact on emergency planning in the province of Ontario, if there’s anything we can do whatsoever, it’s to make sure we tell the people in the province, our citizens, that wind power may be wonderful — everybody wants to have their energy come from green, if it possibly can — but let’s not put them under an illusion that there’s something seriously wrong here, and we’re spending millions and millions of dollars for only 10% of the capacity they actually perform at. That scares me, particularly if someone is foolish enough to actually close down that coal-fired generation in 2007, as Dalton McGuinty promised in his Liberal platform. That is a scary thought.

I understand that they’re going to put one on hold — I think it’s Atikokan, or maybe Nanticoke — but the reality is, if we close the other three, we’re still in a serious problem. If we thought we had a blackout and emergency planning was required in the summer of 2003, God only knows what we’ll need if we shut that coal-fired generation down without a proper, adequate supply of electricity for the future.

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Mr. Norm Miller (Parry Sound-Muskoka): It’s my pleasure to add some comments on the debate this afternoon on Bill 56, An Act to amend the Emergency Management Act, the Employment Standards Act, 2000 and the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997.

We just had our leadoff speech from the hard-working member from Simcoe North, who spoke for an hour on this bill. Toward the end of his speech, one of the points he brought up was the emergency that is being created in this province by this government, by its irresponsible plan to shut down coal-fired generation in the province before it has an adequate supply of electricity to replace that coal-fired generation. I can tell you that there’s an emergency being created in northern Ontario. Every week there’s another paper mill, another forestry company announcing layoffs or slowdowns.

When they talk about some of the recent announcements to do with electricity and solar power at a cost of 42 cents a kilowatt hour or wind power at a cost of 12 cents a kilowatt hour, I can tell you that will not sustain the economy of the province.

Originally, their plan was to shut down coal-fired generation in 2007; that was the first announcement. That has now been backed up to 2009, and I hear rumours of maybe 2011. Of course, that’s well beyond the next election, so this will be another broken promise, thank goodness, that this government will not be able to keep.