Archive for the ‘wind capacity’ Category

TVO's Agenda will feature a panel discussion on Wind Developments

November 2, 2008

TVO’s Agenda this Tuesday will feature a panel discussion on Wind Developments. John Adams of WCO ( Wind Concerns Ontario)is slated to speak on behalf of our new coalition. Tune in if you can.

TVO – Tuesday, Nov. 4th., 8.00 pm

You don’t do this to your neighbors !

Suncor wind farm Ripley

Suncor wind farm Ripley

click for full size

click for full size

Enbridge Wind Farm Kincardine

Enbridge Wind Farm Kincardine

click for full size

You don’t do this to your neighbors !

Go through this information and then tune into TVO on Tuesday, Nov. 4th., 8.00 pm

Wind turbine noise affects health

Homeowners living near windfarms see property values plummet

Wind turbines cause health problems, residents say – CTV News

A Fight Against Windmills In Denmark

Wind energy unreliable, says E.On

Premier, Dalton McGuinty Talks About Renewable Energy For Ontario

Poor Advice Has Led To Noisy Wind Farms Sited Too Close To Houses

OPTIONS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS IN ONTARIO

The Wind Energy Scam- Compare the Numbers

Is Nimby the new “N” Word

Premier, Dalton McGuinty powers a press conference with wind energy

Suncor Wind Farm Ripley Ontario

Bluffs ‘only option’ for wind farm; Toronto Hydro says

October 29, 2008

Editor:

Although renewable energy generation has now reached the numerically equivalent of about 26.5% of annual demand (Bülow, 2005a) and wind turbines account for about 20% of total power production (Eltra, 2005), most of the region’s wind power has to be exported in order to secure stability in the domestic grid.  During 2003, for example, as much as 84% of the annual supply of wind electricity was surplus to demand at its moment of generation (Sharman, 2004), and only about 4% of domestic power consumption was satisfied by wind turbines – Source – Wind power in west Denmark

Bluffs ‘only option’ for wind farm; Toronto Hydro says no other offshore sites in GTA are financially feasible locales for turbine project

The proposed site of a wind farm off the Scarborough Bluffs in Lake Ontario is the only place in the GTA where wind power might be feasible, Toronto Hydro said yesterday.

“Within the City of Toronto borders, it is pretty much the only option,” said Joan McLean, spokesperson for the project.

Noting they had already investigated the west end, McLean added: “The reality is that the construction of offshore wind turbines is not financially feasible (in) over 20 meters of water depth,” which excludes much of the GTA’s shoreline.

Toronto Hydro Energy Services has proposed placing up to 60 massive turbines on a swath of shallow reef from Ajax to the Leslie Spit. The project has prompted intense interest from locals concerned about its impact on the view, the shore, and residents. Some 400 people showed up to an information session Monday – twice as many as could fit in the hall. It was postponed and will be rescheduled.

“The noise concerns me,” said resident Jeanne Gagné. “This would be one of the first to be so close to a residential area. Everybody is pointing at us as being not-in-my-backyard. … But it’s more: Is this the best backyard?” she added.

Wind turbines belong in no ones backyard and yes the noise should concern everyone. The high cost for intermittent power should also be of major concern (added)

Family was forced to leave their home after wind turbines arrived

Family was forced to leave their home after wind turbines arrived

Iain Marlow
Staff Reporter

Full strory at the Toronto Star

Gordon Brown puffs the great wind scam – A Lesson for Canada and the USA

October 26, 2008

Editor: The most important things people need to understand are

  1. The wind industry backed by govt. is a scam. (truth hurts)
  2. Our govt has handed the decision making for our power generation over to the e8 (internationalization of energy) a UN based agency.
  3. Any country that gives up it’s electrical system, has  given up it’s sovereignty. Electricity supply and cost are the most important part of any economy. Once control of the electrical system has been lost (or given away) the ability to make real economic decisions has been lost.
  4. You have now accepted rule by unelected officials.
  5. End of sovereignty.
  6. This is about a lot more than wind energy. It’s about the loss of your freedoms and your nation state.

The time has come for every thinking citizen to join in the fight against the wind industry and  treasonous govt. policy, that has been put in place to undermine both our democracy and sovereignty.

Gordon Brown puffs the great wind scam

Even in these dark times, it is still possible to be shocked when our Prime Minister personally endorses a flagrant perversion of the truth. Last year, for example, many of us felt outraged when Gordon Brown pretended that the Lisbon Treaty was somehow totally different from the EU Constitution, in order to wriggle out of his party’s manifesto promise of a referendum. Last week Mr Brown in effect did it again when he endorsed the deception at the heart of his Government’s wildly exaggerated claims about the benefits of using wind to make electricity.

In a video for the British Wind Energy Association, the industry’s chief lobby group, Mr Brown claimed: “We are now getting 3 gigawatts of our electricity capacity from wind power, enough to power more than 1.5 million homes.”

This deliberately perpetuates the central confidence trick practised by the wind industry, by confusing “capacity” with the actual amount of electricity wind produces. In fact, as the Government’s own figures show, wind turbines generate on average only 27 to 28 per cent, barely a quarter, of their “capacity”.

In other words, far from producing those “3 gigawatts”, the 2,000 turbines already built actually contributed – again on official figures – an average of only 694 megawatts (MW) last year, less than the output of a single medium-size conventional power station. Far from producing “enough to power more than 1.5 million homes”, it is enough to power barely a sixth of that number, representing only 1.3 per cent of all the electricity we use. Yet for this we have already blighted thousands of square miles of countryside, at a cost of billions of pounds.

Indeed, at the same BWEA-sponsored event, Mike O’Brien, energy minister, went on to perpetuate the second confidence trick practised by both Government and industry, which is to conceal the fact that all this is only made possible by the huge hidden subsidy given to wind energy through the Renewables Obligation. This compels electricity companies to pay way over the odds for the power generated by wind turbines, a burden passed on to us all in our electricity bills.

Mr O’Brien claimed that the cost of electricity generated by offshore wind turbines would drop by 8 per cent, failing to explain that it would then be raised by 50 per cent through the hidden subsidy. He then soared even further into make-believe by saying that he was “assessing plans” to build a further 25GW-worth of offshore turbines by 2020, “enough electricity for every home in the country”.

Mr O’Brien must know that there is not the remotest chance that we could build the 10,000 monster turbines needed to achieve this, at a rate of more than two a day, when it takes weeks to instal each vast machine. At present, of the giant barges needed for the work, there is only one in the world. Even if it were possible, the construction costs alone, on current figures, would be anything up to £100 billion – the price of 37 nuclear power stations, capable of producing nearly 10 times as much electricity – while the subsidies alone would add £6 billiion a year more, or 25 per cent, to our electricity bills.

Why do our ministers think they can get away with talking such nonsense?

What is humiliating is that they do it largely to appease the EU, which has set us the wholly impossible target of producing 32 per cent of our electricity from “renewables” by 2020. What is dangerous is that even contemplating such a mad waste of resources is diverting attention from the genuine need to build enough proper, grown-up power stations to keep our lights on. For that the time is fast running out, if it hasn’t done so already. It is on that Mr Brown should be concentrating, not on trying to pull the wool over our eyes with such infantile deceits.

By Christopher Booker

Telegraph

26 October 2008

You might ask – If the wind industry is such a scam why isn’t the media saying anything?

DAVID ROCKEFELLER THANKS MEDIA FOR ITS SILENCE

The Green Agenda

The Problems With On-Grid Wind Power

August 26, 2008

From Maxedoutmama

Here is a paper for dullards like me who didn’t understand the implications of trying to hook highly variable wind power into a power grid. The bottom line is that effective usage is low and that actual replacement effect is even lower:

A power station takes days to start producing electricity from a cold start. Time is needed to boil the water, to superheat the steam, to warm all the components of the power station, and to spin the turbogenerators up to operating speed.

Each power station is designed to provide an output of electricity. It can only provide very little more or very little less than this output (i.e., a power station has a “low turndown ratio”).

The problem of matching electricity supply to varying demand is overcome by operating power stations in three modes called “base load,” “generation,” and “spinning standby.”

Some power stations operate all the time providing electricity to the grid, and they are said to provide “base load.”

Other power stations also operate all the time but do not provide electricity all the time. They burn (or fission) their fuel to boil water and superheat the resulting steam which is fed to the steam turbines that are thus kept hot and spinning all the time. Of course, they emit all the emissions from use of their fuel all the time. But some of this time they dump heat from their cooling towers instead of generating electricity, and they are then said to be operating “spinning standby.”

One or more power stations can be instantly switched from spinning standby to provide electricity to match an increase to demand for electricity. It is said to be operating “generation” when it is providing electricity. Power stations are switched between spinning standby and generation as demand for electricity changes.

Thus the grid operator manages the system to match supply with demand for electricity by switching power stations between “generation” and “spinning standby.”

So if you are installing a bunch of new coal power plants to handle load, you will really be running them all the time with very little savings of fossil fuels. You can control some of the grid surge by diverting the power production away from the grid when your wind kicks in, but that of course doesn’t change fuel consumption very much.

Read the full report here. Maxedoutmama

Germany's Green Energy Plan – Not so Good

July 20, 2008
July 10, 2008 •
Germany


Leader at E.ON urges Germany to keep nuclear plants

With Germany committed to reducing global warming gases while
struggling to deal with soaring fuel costs, one of the giant energy
companies in the country said Thursday that Chancellor Angela Merkel’s
coalition could only deal with both issues by extending the working
life of the country’s nuclear plants.
Wulf Bernotat, chairman of the European energy powerhouse E.ON, said
during an interview here that it was “questionable” whether Merkel’s
government of conservatives and Social Democrats could realize . . .

Complete story (plus email and print links) »


July 7, 2008 •
Germany


Germany wants to build 30 windfarms

The German government wants to build up to 30 offshore windfarms
in a bid to meet its renewable energy targets, Transport Minister
Wolfgang Tiefensee said in an interview published Sunday.
Tiefensee told the Welt am Sonntag newspaper that the windfarms would
be built in the Baltic and North seas and said some 2,000 windmills
should soon be producing 11,000 megawatts of electricity.
The government is aiming to obtain “25,000 megawatts of energy from windfarms by 2030″, Tiefensee . . .

Complete story (plus email and print links) »


June 30, 2008 •
Germany, India


No need of subsidies for wind energy cos: Tanti

The billionaire Chairman of Suzlon Energy Mr Tulsi Tanti has
said wind energy firms does not require subsidies, as the prices of
fossil fuels like oil, gas and coal are becoming more expensive.
Quoting Mr Tanti, the German business weekly WirtschaftsWoche said that
wind energy does not need subsidies as the fossil fuels are turning
more costly. Fossil energy fuels such as oil, gas and coal are turning
more expensive,… therefore the wind ener gy needs . . .

Complete story (plus email and print links) »


May 17, 2008 •
Germany


Germany’s Windwarts Energie to build 20 MW wind park

Germany’s Windwarts Energie plans to build a 20 MW wind park in Buren, in
the German state of Northrhine-Westphalia, the company said Friday.
The park is to consist of 10 turbines of 2 MW capacity each and is due to
take up operations in the first half of 2009, Windwarts Energie said.
According to the company, annual production is to amount to about 50 GWh,
equaling the supply for about 16,500 households.
Windwarts Energie said the location Buren–with an average wind . . .

Complete story (plus email and print links) »


April 15, 2008 •
Germany


German utilities, wind power industry dismiss govt’s 2020 wind power target

German utilities and wind turbine makers have dismissed the
government’s goal of boosting off-shore wind power capacity to 15,000
megawatts by 2020, citing a lack of resources and transmission lines,
Financial Times Deutschland said.
The goal, which is equivalent to 3,000 high-capacity wind turbines, is
‘not viable, neither from an economic nor a technological point of
view,’ the paper quoted a spokesman from German utility E.ON AG as
saying.
The construction of off-shore wind parks is slowed . . .

Complete story (plus email and print links) »


January 31, 2008 •
Germany


German utilities warn of power bottlenecks due to wind integration — report

German utilities are warning the government of bottlenecks in
power transmission grids due to the difficulties of integrating higher
shares of wind energy, Handelsblatt reported.
The paper cited reports on the state of transmission networks German
utilities are required to submit to the German grid regulator by
tomorrow.
The number of incidents has risen significantly over the past two
years, the report said. Vattenfall Europe AG’s transmission unit
recorded 155 days where the situation was critical on . . .

Complete story (plus email and print links) »

Wind power: is it a realistic option?

July 3, 2008

Wind power: is it a realistic option? – Money Week

Is wind power as green as it seems?

Denmark is the world’s most wind-intensive state with more than 6,000 turbines generating 19% of its electricity. But this figure is misleading, says Tony Lodge of the Centre for Policy Studies. Not one conventional power plant has been closed in the period that Danish wind farms have been developed.

In fact, the Danish grid used 50% more coal-generated electricity in 2006 than in 2005 to cover wind’s failings. The quick ramping up and down of those plants has increased their pollution and carbon dioxide output – carbon emissions rose 36% in 2006.

Meanwhile Danish electricity costs are the highest in Europe. The Danish experience suggests wind energy is “expensive, inefficient and not even particularly green”, says Lodge.

Full Story-Money Week

German experience with wind power

March 10, 2008

 

The Annual (2005) Wind Report for E.ON Netz
An account of the German experience with wind power.

Vital information for those interested to know where our money is being wasted,
or diverted into somebody else’s pocket….

The full document ENE_Wind Report 2005 is quite long, but summarised in Summary.pdf

to download, right-click on title, then “save as”… to view immediately in browser, just click on title

E.ON Netz, (the company which owns Powergen) is one of Germany’s largest electric grid operators. It serves a population of 20 million people living in 40 percent of Germany’s land area. It runs 32,500 kilometers of high voltage power lines, and is responsible for integrating 7,000 megawatts of wind power, nearly half of that installed in all Germany, which has more wind power installed than any other country, including the United States and Denmark.

One of E.ON Netz’s most notable conclusions is that wind energy cannot replace conventional power stations to any significant degree.
In the words of the report, “In order to guarantee reliable electricity supplies when wind farms produce little or no power, eg. during periods of calm or storm-related shutdowns, traditional power station capacities must be available as a reserve. This means that wind farms can only replace traditional power station capacities to a limited degree.” (page 9).
Furthermore, the report says that as more wind power is built, its capacity to replace conventional power sources, never more than 8 percent, actually declines. (page 9). In other words, E.ON’s experience shows conclusively that those who expect wind power to prevent a nuclear build up, or to reduce the need for gas and coal stations, have been seriously misled.
This is astounding! That company – perhaps the major player in the windfarm business – is openly declaring that wind power can not deliver the goods when it comes to reducing emissions or producing reliable electricity for our national needs!

Amongst the many questions that inevitably arise:

  • This huge windfarm company recognises that windfarms are essentially useless
    so where does that leave us?
  • Why is this country not learning something from the German experience?
  • Why do windfarm companies continue to force their useless product on to us?

The answer to the last question is obvious enough: quite simply “they do it for the subsidies and for the money”. And they get lots of that! But of course we’ve got lots of money to spare – haven’t we?
Perhaps the self-styled “green” fundamentalists would care to answer the other questions… if they can, or dare…

26 new coal plants in Germany

According to Der Spiegel, Mar. 21, 2007, Germany is planning 26 new coal-fired electricity plants. And according to the New York Times, June 20, 2006, 8 are on a fast track for completion by 2010 or so.

26 new coal plants in Germany

March 4, 2008

 Editor
Wind has been a resounding failure in Europe. The question then is why are we in North America being harassed by this industry.

Wind farms have nothing to do with energy and everything to do with the removal of property rights. Once you understand that Global Warming is a fraud to scare you, it becomes very easy to understand the reality that is Agenda 21. Same thing with biofuels. Who in their right mind would grow food and then burn it.

Agenda 21 

Sorry, it’s only 26 new coal plants in Germany  

[Sources for claims made in response to Wendy Williams’ defense of Cape Wind in Parade magazine, Mar. 2]

According to Der Spiegel, Mar. 21, 2007, Germany is planning 26 new coal-fired electricity plants. And according to the New York Times, June 20, 2006, 8 are on a fast track for completion by 2010 or so. I apologize for any confusion caused by my misremembering the figures as, respectively, 28 and 6.

Several analysts have shown that most — up to 84% in the west — of Denmark’s wind-generated electricity is exported: e.g., Hugh Sharman in the May 2005 Civil Engineering, and David White in the July 2004 Utilities Journal.

The data showing fossil fuel use for electricity going up instead of down as wind energy on the grid increased are in the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2007 from BERR.

It is according to the Danish Wind Industry Association that the last increase in wind energy capacity was between 2002 and 2003.

The near-unanimous (24 of 28 communities surveyed) rejection of more (and much larger) turbines in Denmark was reported by Politiken on Feb. 17 (click here for rough translation by National Wind Watch).

kirbymtn.blogspot.com

No breeze: the day the wind died in Texas

February 29, 2008

 Editor:
4,600 megawatts of wind power in Texas was producing only 1700 mw before the wind dropped and the 1700 mw became 300. In Ontario we have the same problem. It was cold today -10c and at 1pm the 472 megawatts of installed wind power was producing only 8 megawatts. If we had built a 472 mw nuclear plant we would have had 472 megawatts available. Regardless of how many wind turbines are installed there is no way to count on them to produce power when required. Wind turbines push up the cost of electricity without any real benefits. So, the question is, why are we building them?

Carbon credits and Tax Shelters

No breeze: the day the wind died in Texas

Texas, a model of wind power’s potential, now is a model of wind power’s pitfalls too.

Minders of the Lone Star State’s electricity grid had to cut power to some offices and factories Wednesday evening when the wind dropped—and with it, electricity produced from the state’s many wind farms. The green juice slowed from 1,700 megawatts to the trickle of 300 megawatts.

”A cold front moved through, and the wind died out,” said Dottie Roark, spokeswoman for the Electric Reliability Coordinating Council of Texas, or ERCOT, which runs most of the state’s power grid. “That happens.”

Oh, well. Now that wind is big enough to be a real part of Texas’ electricity mix, the state is coming to grips with one of wind power’s biggest problems: the power flows only when the wind blows.

Maybe it’s just a coincidence, but this glitch for wind power occurred the night before the House voted on a renewable-energy bill — a vote in which the Texas delegation mostly voted against more renewable-energy subsidies.

Nuclear, coal- and gas-fired plants run almost all the time. As efficient as wind turbines have become in recent years, they still need the wind to work. And reliably predicting just when the wind will blow is still tough, despite plenty of fancy technological advances.

Wind usually falls off with rising temperatures. But a sudden gust of cool weather can do the same. The people running the electricity grid need to stay on their toes to throw other forms of power on line when wind falters.

“Renewables are a very intermittent source of electric supply,” says Larry Makovich, managing director at Cambridge Enegy Research Associates, a Boston-based energy consultancy that recently published a bullish report on the prospects for renewable energy. “What you saw in Texas is a very dramatic example as to why that is the case.”

This problem is only going to get bigger for Texas. The state has 4,600 megawatts of wind power. If wind blew all the time, that would be the equivalent of more than three nuclear plants. The state now is considering additional wind farms that could boost that figure ten-fold, say Texas’ grid operators. That is, when there’s a breeze.

Matthew Dalton
Dow Jones Newswires

Posted by Jeffrey Ball

Environmental Capital – WSJ.com

Wel’s windfarm critic has plenty of hits at hearing

February 28, 2008

 Editor:
Meet Sean Cox, a man with attitude. The right attitude. Forget about being polite. Get your message through to the dim witted politicians that are supposed to be looking out for the best interests of their constituents. Take no crap, they work for you. Make sure they understand this fact loud and clear. Call them at home, show up at their doors. Make their lives as miserable as they are attempting to makes yours.

WAKE THEM UP AND MAKE THEM LISTEN

Wel’s windfarm critic has plenty of hits at hearing

The more Wel Networks’ proposed Te Uku wind farm is investigated, the worse it looks, says one of the project’s most vociferous critics.

Aotea Harbour aerodynamicist Sean Cox the man most responsible for the project’s hearing still running returned to Ngaruawahia yesterday to take another crack at Wel’s application to build and operate a 28-turbine wind farm.

With a mix of pointy-headed science and gratuitous insults, he delivered a 212 hour dissertation on the problems with wind farms, Wel Networks, the Resource Management Act process, and new trends in the energy sector.

Earlier Wel Networks had painted him as an unreliable witness who lacked credibility, but Mr Cox scored plenty of hits in concluding the wind farm was “an economic and power supply disaster”.

“If it had been built a year ago it would not have earned enough in the last year at wholesale power rates to get close to covering its interest payments,” he said.

He believed Wel’s economic modelling took no account of damage from adverse weather, legal action from future realised health effects, obsolescence due to improved alternate technology, or reduced income through technological change or altered government policies.

“Wind power is now obsolete for the North Island,” he said, in tabling economic models for alternate power projects.

And there was an ominous warning for Wel if they did proceed. “Should these turbines be built, they will be the best monitored ones in the world. Every watt of power, every squeak of sound, every whiff of subsonics and every bird they kill will be recorded. Then we will see who was right.”

Mr Cox, a wind farm pioneer and designer of fighter aircraft for British Aerospace, refused to give his full qualifications to the hearing.

“Just call me Mr Cox. Far too much weight is given to qualifications and it disadvantages ordinary people. Take the evidence as I have presented it.

By Bruce Holloway

Waikato Times