Posts Tagged ‘New Zealand’

Two Inspiring Stories in 2008

November 27, 2008

Editor: In a year of continuous bad news, these two stories are a bright spot.

Ireland voted no on the Lisbon treaty – proving that a small country can still stand up.

New Zealand – the first country to openly question global warming.

Two small countries take a stand.

May we learn from them.

Lets make 2009 the year we beat back the NWO threat and take back control of our nation states. If we have to throw every politician out of office to accomplish the task, so be it.

We are not globalists – we are citizens of our respective countries.

Let us never give up that freedom!

Be proud of your country

Be proud of your country

.

Ireland Rejects the EU in Vote

Australian Climate Madness: Bravo New Zealand

The government has also suggested a possible review of the science behind climate change, a move that has outraged environmental groups, who say New Zealand’s reputation will be damaged if the concept of global warming is questioned.

Have you ever heard such unadulterated nonsense in a single sentence? Did I read that correctly? A possible review has “outraged environmental groups”? Sorry, is this science we’re talking about, or the dogma of religion? Perish the thought that the divine words of the IPCC, as spoken through the prophet Al Gore, should ever be questioned. Quick, throw another heretic on the fire.

As for their reputation being damaged, in my book, it’s quite the reverse. Bravo New Zealand.

Farmers protest 'flatulence' tax

March 28, 2008

 Editor
Just when I thought the ECO – FREAKS couldn’t get any stranger.

One more reason I’ll be turning my lights on to celebrate earth hour.

Farmers protest ‘flatulence’ tax
AP
WELLINGTON, New Zealand – Farmers are mailing parcels of sheep and cow manure to lawmakers to protest a so-called “flatulence” tax on greenhouse gas emissions from their flocks and herds, the New Zealand’s postal service complained Tuesday.
The service said about 20 reeking packages and envelopes had been sent to the nation’s Parliament and that the protest – dubbed the “Raise a Stink” campaign – was endangering the health of postal workers.

Farmers are angry that the government has levied the tax to raise 8 million New Zealand dollars (US$4.7 million) a year – about 300 New Zealand dollars (US$177) for average farms and ranches – for research into methane gas emissions from agricultural animals.
Millions of sheep, cattle and other animals that graze on New Zealand’s lush farmlands are thought to produce 55 percent of the country’s greenhouse gases.

New Zealand Post spokesman Ian Long said sending manure by the mail was a crime.
“Our main concern is for the health and safety of our people,” said Long. “The police have told us that they will prosecute if they can prove wrongdoing.”
Mail sorting workers were wearing protective gloves and placing suspect parcels into bags, he said.
Parliamentary security officials said some stained and damp mail items had been intercepted before they made it to government ministers.

Adam Fricker, editor of the Rural News newspaper which encouraged the protest, said farmers had taken “radical” action to get the ear of the government.
“Farmers feel marginalized. They don’t have the voice in Parliament they once had … to really get traction on an issue when a ridiculous tax like this is being foisted on them,” he said.
Agriculture Minister Jim Sutton said climate change from greenhouse gases “is the world’s biggest environmental problem. We have to do something about it.”
He said farmers could be “responsible guardians” of the environment and help generate new technology to deal with animal methane.
Dismissing the manure protest as “nonsense,” Sutton said an alternative to the tax was for farmers pay emission levies like other industrial sectors. That would cost them tens of millions of dollars more a year.

Greenhouse gases, such as methane and carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels like coal and oil, are being blamed for a feared warming of the atmosphere.
Environmentalists fear it will cause havoc with global weather patterns and trigger sea level rises.




I could make a comment…but I have way too much class. :-)Algore would be very proud of the NZ government.
1 posted on 07/16/2003 7:02:58 AM PDT by Valin

To: Valin
I could give a fart.
2 posted on 07/16/2003 7:03:57 AM PDT by Semper Paratus

To: Valin
“Algore would be very proud of the NZ government. “Exactly. Add the opresive fanaticism of the eco-wackos to the scary willingness of Clintoon to use disproportianate force against ordinary Americans and we see how lucky we were to keep wierd Al out of the Oval Office.
3 posted on 07/16/2003 7:07:33 AM PDT by BenLurkin (Socialism is slavery.)

To: Valin
Let me tell you how it will be There’s one for you, nineteen for me Cos I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman Should five per cent appear too small Be thankful I don’t take it all Cos I’m the taxman, yeah I’m the taxman If you drive a car, I’ll tax the street
If you try to sit, I’ll tax your seat
If you get too cold I’ll tax the heat
If you take a walk, I’ll tax your feet

Taxman!
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah I’m the taxman
Don’t ask me what I want it for (Aahh Mr. Wilson)
If you don’t want to pay some more (Aahh Mr. Heath)
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman

Now my advice for those who die
Declare the pennies on your eyes
Cos I’m the taxman, yeah, I’m the taxman
And you’re working for no one but me
Taxman!

The Beatles – Revolver

4 posted on 07/16/2003 7:07:34 AM PDT by bedolido (Ann Coulter… A Conservative Male’s Natural Viagra)

To: Valin

In a saner era, the only people declaring that sheep farts mean doom for the earth would be safely confined to mental institutions. Now they form expensive multi-national committees around them. Welcome to the modern world.

SourceFree Republic

Wel’s windfarm critic has plenty of hits at hearing

February 28, 2008

 Editor:
Meet Sean Cox, a man with attitude. The right attitude. Forget about being polite. Get your message through to the dim witted politicians that are supposed to be looking out for the best interests of their constituents. Take no crap, they work for you. Make sure they understand this fact loud and clear. Call them at home, show up at their doors. Make their lives as miserable as they are attempting to makes yours.

WAKE THEM UP AND MAKE THEM LISTEN

Wel’s windfarm critic has plenty of hits at hearing

The more Wel Networks’ proposed Te Uku wind farm is investigated, the worse it looks, says one of the project’s most vociferous critics.

Aotea Harbour aerodynamicist Sean Cox the man most responsible for the project’s hearing still running returned to Ngaruawahia yesterday to take another crack at Wel’s application to build and operate a 28-turbine wind farm.

With a mix of pointy-headed science and gratuitous insults, he delivered a 212 hour dissertation on the problems with wind farms, Wel Networks, the Resource Management Act process, and new trends in the energy sector.

Earlier Wel Networks had painted him as an unreliable witness who lacked credibility, but Mr Cox scored plenty of hits in concluding the wind farm was “an economic and power supply disaster”.

“If it had been built a year ago it would not have earned enough in the last year at wholesale power rates to get close to covering its interest payments,” he said.

He believed Wel’s economic modelling took no account of damage from adverse weather, legal action from future realised health effects, obsolescence due to improved alternate technology, or reduced income through technological change or altered government policies.

“Wind power is now obsolete for the North Island,” he said, in tabling economic models for alternate power projects.

And there was an ominous warning for Wel if they did proceed. “Should these turbines be built, they will be the best monitored ones in the world. Every watt of power, every squeak of sound, every whiff of subsonics and every bird they kill will be recorded. Then we will see who was right.”

Mr Cox, a wind farm pioneer and designer of fighter aircraft for British Aerospace, refused to give his full qualifications to the hearing.

“Just call me Mr Cox. Far too much weight is given to qualifications and it disadvantages ordinary people. Take the evidence as I have presented it.

By Bruce Holloway

Waikato Times

Pushing against the wind

February 3, 2008

Editor:
Same crap different country.
The IESO in Ontario states that for planning purposes wind should only be counted on for 10% of it’s capacity rating. So, 1,000MW of wind is equivalent to 100MW of conventional power. The Govt., Media, and the Wind Industry continue to refer to the number of homes powered by wind, based on full capacity not the reality of 10%. At 7am today the 472MWs of wind power in Ont. were pumping out 18MWs, which is 3.82% of their plated capacity. 300 hones powered per MW for 18MW is 5400 homes. The govt. wind industry and the media would like you to believe that 141,600 are being powered by wind.

They should all be charged for false advertising. If they are not being truthful about the real capacity of wind, what else are they not telling us about our electrical system.

How does Dalton McGuinty, Premier of Ont., feel about wind energy?

Ontario Hansard – 19-April2006
“I think the member opposite knows that when it comes to natural gas, prices there tend to be volatile, and it remains a significant contributor to global warming. Wind turbines: We are investing heavily in those, but again, those are an expensive form of electricity and they’re not reliable, because sometimes obviously the wind does not blow. When it comes to solar, those tend to be expensive as well.”

Pushing against the wind

The wind rush is on. Plans to erect sweeping wind farms are being unfurled at a rate of knots. But is this really clean green energy, or just another case of greedy corporates trashing our landscapes for profit? Anton Oliver argues it’s about time New Zealanders woke up to the dark side of wind power.

Forests of turbines spinning on distant hills: in these carbon-aware times, the glory of wind farms is being touted as the one-stop solution to all our energy ills. So aggressive has been the rush to build them that a week doesn’t seem to go by without a new application for an industrial-scale turbine site going before a local council for consideration under the Resource Management Act (RMA), with a mad green fervour.

You’d be forgiven, then, if it escaped your notice that wind power was part of the problem, not the solution, when the Electricity Commission last week announced that we’re teetering on the brink of yet another major electricity shortage.

The emergency button that is Whirinaki’s diesel-burning power plant (the official national standby) had been pushed, initiated by high wholesale electricity prices thanks to equipment failure at Taranaki’s combined-cycle plant, high water temperatures in the Waikato River forcing Huntly’s coal-burning plant to trim back production and becalmed summer skies over Manawatu meaning its plethora of wind turbines were as useful as wet paper toothpicks.

It may also have escaped your attention that as we rush to cover the country in wind farms (more precisely, as the energy oligarchs rush to gather the armfuls of carbon credits being dangled before them by government as a green bribe), in Europe far greater scrutiny is being applied to the imposition of these vast energy factories upon the environment.

Last week it was leaked that plans for the largest land-based wind farm in Britain, a 181-turbine development in the Scottish Hebrides, are to be vetoed by Scottish ministers due to likely negative impacts on wild birdlife. Likewise, a 27-turbine project in the rolling uplands of Cumbria, England an area with similar tourism and landscape values to Central Otago was deemed “a step too far” in the quest for green energy.

You won’t have read about it here because it’s not in the interests of this country’s major power players to tell you. The Labour-led government has its blinkers on trying to make up for its gross miscalculation of our Kyoto obligations come 2012 (which, rather than deliver us a profit as Labour initially declared, will, according to Business New Zealand projections, cost us as much as $3 billion), frantically searching for alternative revenue streams hence its renewed interest in carbon credits and emissions trading to pay for its incompetence.

Based on the evidence so far, its stated energy and climate change policy to be 90% renewable in our energy generation by the year 2025 should not be seen as green or carbon friendly, but a state-directed, revenue-motivated assault on New Zealand’s natural environment.

The least the government should have done is to come up with a sensible, national, overarching strategy for wind energy generation in New Zealand: instead energy generators including the government’s own SOE, Meridian Energy have seized upon the lack of guidelines in a frantic wind rush for the most cost-effective sites.

Hang on, isn’t the RMA supposed to safeguard us from the excesses of corporate developers?

While the RMA is touted as being a democratic process, the reality is that the success of an appellant’s case comes down to how much money they can raise; since most don’t have a spare $100,000-$500,000 in their coffers to pay a QC and their support staff.

An opponent as financially rotund as Meridian, meanwhile, has a team of lawyers and expensive experts and can afford a cartel of QCs to browbeat local councillors and other beleaguered individuals seriously out of their depth who tend to make up resource consent hearing panels.

Last week, the Crown, via the Ministry for the Environment, made a whole-of-government submission supporting Project Hayes (Meridian’s controversial 176 turbines, proposed for Central Otago, which is headed for the Environment Court).

It cited wind generation as being of national interest since it “ensures” security of energy supply by providing additional generation capacity and diversification of electricity production methods and, secondly, supposedly helps New Zealand address climate change issues.

Yet no one is asking the hard questions of a government desperate to sell itself to an increasingly green-aware public in election year.

As the fine print of the Energy Commission release indicated, wind energy is not reliable. No one knows when it will blow. At best, crude statistics are used to predict how much it will blow on average over very long time frames (months, years). Wind generation cannot be calculated with any security: will it blow tomorrow morning, Friday evening or next Wednesday at 6pm when Huntly’s going to be offline or the hydro lakes are low?

New Zealanders are sold on the concept that all wind is green, therefore large-scale wind is the panacea for all our woes. But wind farms like Project Hayes are attractive to the generator oligarchy only because of economics of scale and carbon credits: together they make industrial-sized wind not only financially viable, but exceedingly profitable.

Basing security of supply, meanwhile, on something that is as inherently unpredictable is somewhere south of foolish. Overseas experience has already shown that for every 1000 megawatts of wind generation installed less than 10% can be calculated as firm generating capacity, therefore increasing rather than decreasing traditional energy supply (often carbon-emitting) because of the fundamental problem: when the wind stops blowing, where does the power come from?

Meridian and other generators continue to regurgitate their standard spiel that this or that wind farm is “capable of producing enough electricity to power 100,000 homes”. Try supplying Wellington’s Courtenay Pl, Lambton Quay, the Beehive and ancillary government buildings with wind power only for a year and in December ask them how they got on.

Wind surges also cause massive voltage and frequency increases, threatening the integrity and stability of the grid (which, under Cook Strait, even last week had to be held at a paltry 400MW to stop the system from overloading). Of course, sudden decreases in wind have to be replaced by alternative, ready-to-go energy standbys such as Whirinaki. Not the kind of admission we tend to hear from energycoms as they try to push their wind schemes on to an unsuspecting public.

Leaving aside the belief that it will have unacceptable environmental and tourism impacts on an iconic slice of Otago, Meridian’s Project Hayes wind farm has yet to disclose any alternative methods for generating electricity when it isn’t blowing, nor how the grid will handle the load placed on it, nor even some basic science collected from the site to back up their claims that this is a good thing for the country as a whole.

Peak Oil New Zealand