Posts Tagged ‘property value’

Home near turbines won't sell

May 23, 2008

Editor
A property 900 meters from wind turbines In England had been deemed unsaleable. Most wind turbines in Ont. have a 450 meter setback. Kiss your property value goodbye.

Don’t forget to send your elected officials a card thanking them for their concern.

.

Home near turbines won’t sell – agent

A couple who have been forced out of their home by wind turbine noise have found out their house is unsaleable.

Jane and Julian Davis moved out of their Deeping St Nicholas home in Christmas 2006 after months of sleepless nights due to what they believe is noise and vibration from wind turbines, which are around 900m from their property.

They have long believed it has no value, and their fears have now been proved justified, after estate agents Munton and Russell refused to market the property at Grays Farm.

Mrs Davis said: “We have said for a long time that our house has no market value at the moment.

“But people said ‘put your money where your mouth is’ and prove it. While we knew that was the case, it is still a very painful thing to see written down.”

Russell Gregory wrote to Mr and Mrs Davis saying until the problems with wind turbines were resolved it was impossible to put a current market value on the property as no prospective buyer would want to live there and no mortgage lender would be prepared to lend on it.

He said: “I don’t think I have ever refused one before.

“Everything has a value, but where that value lies with something like this is a bit of an unknown quantity.

“We have a duty towards the buyer but if you can’t sleep there then it is uninhabitable.”

Mr and Mrs Davis own the house but they have another 23 years to run on the tenancy of the farmland.

And if it was not for Lincolnshire County Council relaxing their rules, Mr and Mrs Davis would not be allowed to moved out without losing the land and the bungalow in which Mr Davis’ parents still live.

The whole situation has seen their plans for the future, including extending the house, thrown into turmoil.

Mrs Davis added: “It was all our life’s dreams. We had plans to build on. Everything was ready to proceed but ultimately there was no point.”

By Tom Hughes

Spalding Today

22 May 2008

Wind farm prospects promising

April 2, 2008

Editor
This wind farm is located in Northern Ont. far away from the heavily populated southern part of the province. What I find interesting about this piece is the statement below.

“Noise isn’t expected to be a concern because the nearest dwelling is two km away from any of the proposed turbines, Kerr said”.

What about the people in Southern Ont. where the wind turbines will be, on average, only 400 meters from homes. Should these people expect noise problems.

Research and real life experiences show that the odds on these people suffering noise, flicker, and real estate depreciation will be very high.

The wind industry has convinced the govt. that they need small setbacks in order to make their project cost effective. The fact is, homes are to close together in Southern Ont. to accommodate a reasonable setback. SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO………

The govt., from your local council to the office of Premier Dalton McGuinty, and the wind industry have decided that you and your property are not important. They sell wind farms on the idea of saving the environment, while they trash your environment. Ironic.

The wind industry making money is more important than you, your family or your property.

Give Dalton a call and ask him yourself. If he tells you the wind turbines are to reduce C02 which causes GLOBAL WARMING. You might want to inform him the warming stopped in 1998. The C02 – global warming argument doesn’t hold water.
Wait a minute you say. If the warming stopped in 1998 why are they building wind farms?

Good Question

The only GREEN I can find in the wind industry is the cash being made, at your expense.

Germany has the most wind yet they are building 26 new coal fired plants. Doesn’t give one much faith in wind, does it.

Anyone from the govt. or the wind industry that wants to debate, I’m available. 519-396-1958

.

Wind farm raises health concerns

Posted on March 28, 2008.

Editor
research has suggested that those effects don’t cause long-term health impacts after people are no longer living near wind farms”.

.

Wind farm prospects promising

One of the more significant economic developments Marathon has seen in several years has taken another step to being approved.

Brookfield Power‘s plan for a $250-million wind-power farm about 20 kilometres west of town could receive government approval this spring following a mandatory public review of an environmental “screening” report.

The Ottawa-area company wants to build 66 turbines on Crown land in an unpopulated area just north of Neys Provincial Park.

The turbines, each 80 metres tall and sporting three blades as long as half a soccer field, are to collectively produce up to 100 megawatts of electricity.

That‘s about half the capacity of Brookfield‘s existing wind farm just outside Sault Ste. Marie.

Brookfield project manager Ian Kerr said construction on the Marathon-area site is expected to begin in 2010, creating a maximum of 200 jobs over the 18-month construction period.

The company will likely establish an office in Marathon to be staffed by about 10 service technicians, Kerr added.

Though the network of turbines will require the construction of about 40 km of access roads, there will only be a handful of locations from the Trans-Canada Highway that will offer a view of the machines, said Kerr.

Noise isn‘t expected to be a concern because the nearest dwelling is two km away from any of the proposed turbines, Kerr said.

The environmental report does not identify any significant impact on birds or other wildlife.

Though details haven‘t been finalized, the wind farm is expected to plug into the provincial energy grid through an existing 230,000-volt transmission line.

Kerr said the turbines the company plans to use have a life-span of about 25 years. Service technicians access the hub and blades by climbing up inside the towers.

The environmental screening report can be viewed online at coldwellwind.com.

Hard copies can be obtained at Marathon town hall, Pic River First Nation band office or the Ministry of Environment office in Thunder Bay at 435 James St. S.

Public comments must be received by May 1.

By CARL CLUTCHEY

Wednesday, April 2, 2008

chroniclejournal.com